Drawer title

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit. Nulla molestiae laudantium quis et, veniam, eveniet aperiam facere dolorem iusto reiciendis veritatis dolorum nisi? Eligendi inventore nam nihil, rem dolores nulla autem repellat sunt iure omnis ullam nisi voluptatem id expedita beatae, officiis accusantium consequatur, ea dignissimos enim consequuntur odio cumque.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit. Nulla molestiae laudantium quis et, veniam, eveniet aperiam facere dolorem iusto reiciendis veritatis dolorum nisi? Eligendi inventore nam nihil, rem dolores nulla autem repellat sunt iure omnis ullam nisi voluptatem id expedita beatae, officiis accusantium consequatur, ea dignissimos enim consequuntur odio cumque. !!!!!

Instrument Rating

The Instrument rating is designed to teach pilots to operate aircraft in low-visibility environments, such as heavy cloud cover or heavy rain. An Instrument Rating is a rating that is added to a Private Pilot or Commercial Pilot License which allows you to fly under instrument flight rules (IFR).

Contact us Chat with us

Instrument Rating

The Instrument Rating is the next logical step, after the Private Pilot License, for pilots looking to expand the flight territory in which they can safely operate, and to increase their overall business/personal flight capabilities. The certification itself is supplementary to the Private Pilot or Commercial licenses, and qualifies the pilot to fly under Instrument Flight Rules (IFR).


Overview

The Instrument Pilot Course is designed to teach pilots to operate aircraft in low-visibility environments, such as heavy cloud cover or heavy rain. The flight lessons in the course provide pilots the knowledge to rely solely on instruments to navigate the aircraft in situations where they cannot rely on visual instincts.

As many pilots can attest, weather conditions do not always permit the sole reliance on visual flying tactics, which hinders the ability to fly on certain days. The Instrument Rating is essential for any pilot looking to improve flight safety and proceed with their pursuit of a career in flying. Pilots without the rating are prevented from operating aircraft in certain weather conditions where visibility is greatly reduced, which limits their maximum allowable altitude, restricts the ability to operate the aircraft at night, and more.

Holding an Instrument Rating also allows pilots the ability to operate under an IFR flight plan which provides Air Traffic Control services not available to VFR pilots except upon special request, such as traffic advisories, airspace transitions, and vectors. When operating in high-volume airspace, these privileges are a significant advantage.

Requirements

👉Be at least 17 years old.

👉Have at least a third-class medical certificate

👉Read, speak, write, and understand English.

👉Proof of U.S. citizenship or TSA approval


What do I need to complete to get my instrument rating?

Complete ground training through a flight instructor or self-study course

You must learn how to communicate with air traffic control, use instruments for navigation and approaches, avoid wind shear, and operate the aircraft safely under instrument flight rules (IFR). Again, you need to receive an endorsement from your instructor in order to take the knowledge test.

Pass the written exam with a score of 70 percent or better

Just like with the private pilot knowledge exam, you will go to a testing centre and answer 60 multiple-choice questions in 2.5 hours. The good news is that the vast majority (93 percent) of students who took this exam in 2018 passed.

Log the required number of hours

You will need at least 50 hours as pilot in command of cross-country flights, plus 40 hours in a plane or simulator demonstrating your abilities in areas like air traffic control procedures and clearances, instrument approaches, navigation systems, and emergency operations. You’ll also need to do at least one cross-country flight under IFR that goes further than 250 nautical miles and includes at least three different types of instrument approaches. Your instructor must certify that you are ready for the check-ride.

Pass the checkride

As before, this includes a couple of hours for the oral portion and one or two hours for the flight portion.

Tuition

Flight – Cessna 172 or Archer III w/ Instructor 25 hours
Instrument Ground School15 hours
Simulator – Cessna 172 or Archer III w/ Instructor15 hours
Plane rental for the check rideUp to 2 hours
Total Course Tuition$8,299.00

Questions&Answers

  • In general, it usually takes two to four months to earn the instrument rating. If you use a simulator for 20 of the 40 total required hours, the expense is likely to be a little less.

    However, our course durations are estimates, and we highly encourage you to chat with us about your training needs and availability for a customized approximation.

  • Unlike other flight schools, Farmingdale Aviation has FAA-certified simulator, saving students a significant amount of money as they are able to supplement training for their Instrument Rating in a resource that minimizes operational costs. Our Flight Simulator Team performs routine tests on each of the devices to ensure that our students are experiencing flight training the simulator in a way that properly prepares them to execute the same maneuvers in an actual airplane. The FAA requires students to log a minimum of 35 total flight hours in order to be eligible for the Instrument Rating; however, less than 5% of pilots complete their training within the minimum flight requirements.

  • The possibilities are endless! Contact us to talk about the opportunities available to you. Having earned your PPL means you are ready to continue on to earn your Instrument Rating. After that, you can decide if you want to continue with your Commercial Pilot’s License.

  • Our instructors are active airline pilots who work with the simulator on their days off. The best way to meet/chat with an instructor is to book a lesson online or by calling us.

  • For flight training, we tend to choose the Cessna 172 or Piper Archer with the Garmin G1000 because that is what you’d fly in real life.

  • The hours logged on a simulator or airplane do not expire, but if a pilot has not flown in a long time, they are required by the FAA to meet a standard and experience level.

Let's talk
YOU CAN CALL US AT

+ 1 (631) 831 6775
Hours: Mon - Fri, 9AM - 5PM